Corpse Bride
CorpseBride.jpg
Directed by:
Music by:
Cinematography:
Art direction:
{{{design}}}
Distributed by:
Warner Bros. Pictures
Release date(s):
September 23, 2005 (United States)
October 13, 2005 (United Kingdom)
Running time:
77 minutes
Budget:
$40 million
Gross revenue:
$118.1 million

Corpse Bride (also known as Tim Burton's Corpse Bride) is a 2005 British-American stop-motion animated musical fantasy film directed by Mike Johnson and Tim Burton. Corpse Bride was Burton's first full-length stop-motion film as a director.

Plot[edit | edit source]

Victor Van Dort, the son of nouveau riche fish merchants, and Victoria Everglot, the neglected daughter of impoverished aristocrats, prepare for their arranged marriage, which will simultaneously raise the social class of Victor's parents and restore the wealth of Victoria's family ("According to Plan"). Although they fall in love instantly, the nervous Victor ruins their wedding rehearsal by forgetting his vows and clumsily setting Lady Everglot's dress on fire. Fleeing to a nearby forest, he practices his vows with a tree and places his wedding ring on a root. However, the root is revealed to be the finger of a dead woman named Emily, who rises from the grave claiming that she is now Victor's wife, and spirits him away to the Land of the Dead.

During his time with her, Victor learns that Emily was murdered years ago by an unnamed perpetrator, on the night of her elopement, and he stole the family jewels she had brought ("Remains of the Day"). Emily reunites Victor with his long deceased dog, Scraps, and they bond. Desperate to return to Victoria, Victor tricks Emily into returning them to the Land of the Living by claiming he wants her to meet his parents. Emily brings Victor to see Elder Gutknecht, the kindly ruler of the underworld, who grants them temporary passage. Victor, feeling guilty for tricking Emily, asks the bride to wait in the forest. He successfully reunites with Victoria and confesses his wish to marry her as soon as possible. Before the pair can share a kiss, Emily discovers them and, feeling betrayed and hurt, drags Victor back to the Land of the Dead ("Tears to Shed"). Victoria quickly tries to tell her parents of Victor's situation, but neither believe her and assume he has left her. Against her will, they decide to marry her to a presumed-wealthy visitor named Lord Barkis Bittern, who appeared at the wedding rehearsal.

After reconciling with Emily, Victor learns of Victoria's impending marriage to Barkis from his family's newly deceased coachman. Upset over this news, Victor decides to marry Emily, learning that this will require him to repeat his wedding vows in the Land of the Living and drink a deadly poison in order to join her in death. The dead swiftly prepare for the ceremony and head "upstairs" ("The Wedding Song"), where the town erupts into a temporary panic upon their arrival until everyone recognizes their departed loved ones, and joyously reunite. The chaos causes a panicked Barkis to expose his own poor financial standing and his intentions to marry Victoria only for her supposed wealth, leading her to reject him.

Victoria follows everyone to Victor and Emily's wedding as Victor completes his vows and prepares to drink the poison, only for Emily to stop him when she realizes she is denying Victoria her chance to live happily with him. Just as Emily reunites Victor and Victoria, Barkis arrives to kidnap Victoria. Emily recognizes him as her previous fiancé and reveals he was also her murderer. Victor duels with Barkis to protect Victoria, and Emily intervenes to save Victor's life. Barkis mockingly toasts Emily for dying unwed and unwittingly drinks the poison that Victor nearly took, causing him to die and allowing the dead – who cannot interfere in the affairs of the living – to take retribution against him for his crimes. Emily, now freed from her torment, frees Victor of his vow to marry her and returns his ring, allowing him to marry Victoria, whom she throws her wedding bouquet to. As she steps into the moonlight, she fades away into hundreds of butterflies and flies into the sky, finding peace, as Victor and Victoria watch and embrace.

Voice cast[edit | edit source]

Musical numbers[edit | edit source]

Production[edit | edit source]

Development[edit | edit source]

  • The film is based on a 19th-century Russian-Jewish folktale, which Joe Ranft introduced to Burton while they were finishing The Nightmare Before Christmas. The film began production in November 2003, while Burton was completing Big Fish.

Filming[edit | edit source]

  • The filming was done at 3 Miles Studios in London.
  • During the shooting of this film, Burton and Depp were working on Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. During the day Depp was Wonka, at night he was Victor. Burton had an assistant director who would take his place when he was making Charlie and the Chocolate Factory.

Reception[edit | edit source]

Critical reaction[edit | edit source]

The critical reaction was generally positive.

References[edit | edit source]


External links[edit | edit source]


Trivia[edit | edit source]

This is Tim Burton's only stop motion film not to be made by Disney.

Videos[edit | edit source]

  Burton films
Features

Pee-wee's Big Adventure · Beetlejuice · Batman · Edward Scissorhands · Batman Returns · Ed Wood · Mars Attacks! · Sleepy Hollow · Planet of the Apes · Big Fish · Charlie and the Chocolate Factory · Corpse Bride · Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street · Alice in Wonderland · Dark Shadows · Frankenweenie · Big Eyes · Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children · Dumbo · Beetlejuice Returns

Other

The Island of Doctor Agor · Doctor of Doom · Stalk of the Celery Monster · Luau · Vincent · Hansel and Gretel · Frankenweenie · Aladdin and His Wonderful Lamp · The Jar · Conversations with Vincent · The World of Stainboy · Kung Fu · Mannequin · Bones · Here With Me


Community content is available under CC-BY-SA unless otherwise noted.